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The 2018 Farm Bill Will Change America in Many Ways

Posted by Julia Wright on

For decades, the prohibition for growing Hemp has prevented jobs from being created for farmers in America. It has restricted the production of sustainable, Eco-friendly products to be made for consumers and denied the use of an alternative medicine with no nasty side-effects that has been proven to be beneficial for patients all over the world.
   Thankfully many smart and dedicated people worked hard behind the scenes and in many public forums to make some very dramatic positive changes in America. In 2018 the US Farm Bill legalized commercial production of hemp! This will offer farmers a chance to raise a crop that has thousands of potential uses and is more sustainable to grow than cotton, tobacco and many others. Small family farms that have been struggling have the opportunity to switch to growing a crop that can turn their financial lives around.

A little History
Way back when, an angry and lobby-influenced Congress passed the Marihuana Tax Act of 1937, which effectively outlawed the possession of cannabis—including hemp—after hundreds of years of growth and use from the time of British colonization onward.
People in power, influenced by a group of large corporations, decided that the hemp plant should be made illegal, because its cousin named "marijuana" could give people an altered sense of reality in a similar, but different way as did alcohol.
How lawmakers in 1937 could ignore the reasoning offered in Colonial times, seems blatantly absurd.
An excerpt from letter written by George Washington when he was promoting the growing of both cotton and hemp reads: “The advantages which would result to this Country from the produce of articles, which ought to be manufactured at home is apparent . . .”
(Reference: http://www.antiquecannabisbook.com/chap04/Virginia/VA_IndHempP2.htm)
Take this advice in and think about how much of the current trade imbalances might have been avoided if Hemp had never been criminalized.

While the Marihuana Tax Act of 1937 was repealed in the late 1960s, cannabis was quickly included as a Schedule 1 drug (the most “dangerous” class of drugs including heroin) in the Controlled Substances Act, a designation which still is in place for marijuana.

Hemp used to grow wild and on many farms where it was often used to feed animals. And it can in no way alter anyone’s actions as does marijuana and alcohol and a whole other grocery list of drugs. Yet while alcohol continued to be sold all around the world and in America, hemp was banned in the USA until now.

The Time has Come to Lift this Foolish Prohibition!
Thankfully, after 81 years, the passing of the 2018 Farm Bill represents the largest step towards undoing the scientifically-baseless legacy of the Marihuana Tax Act of 1937.

The 2018 Farm Bill officially reclassifies hemp for commercial uses after decades of statutes and legal enforcement relating to the criminalization of hemp and marijuana. The Farm Bill distinguishes between the two by removing hemp from the Controlled Substances Act. This will effectively move regulation and enforcement of hemp crops from the purview of the Drug Enforcement Agency to the U.S. Department of Agriculture.

The foolish prohibition of cannabis has caused America to fall far behind using Hemp in the many ways that other countries have discovered to create healthy, Eco-friendly and sustainable products.

The longstanding twisted logic that caused hemp to be banned from being grown in the USA has been costly for our country.

The prohibition of hemp in America for decades has suppressed potential jobs for farmers, stymied the creation of products for consumers, and denied medicine without side-effects for patients who haven’t had success what is offered by the mainstream medical offerings.

That is all about to change for the betterment of our country and farmers who have been struggling to make a living.


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